Bachelor of Business (Hospitality Management)

A rewarding career that can take you to any corner of the world.

Hospitality is any situation where a host provides a service to a guest, and is traditionally related to food, drink or accommodation. The global hospitality and tourism industry moves beyond this – it’s now the world’s largest and fastest growing industry. It is a career that can take you anywhere in the world.

If you crave adventure and variety, a Bachelor of Business in Hospitality Management can prepare you for the exhilarating career in the global hospitality industry. Gain the knowledge, attributes, skills and experience of higher-level hospitality concepts and operations. Throughout William Blue hospitality manager courses, you will study critical business and management subjects with a view to enter the fast-changing global hospitality industry.

Students can study our hospitality management course with an event management focus. There are six event management electives to choose from.

Postgraduate pathway options exist for graduates to continue on to a related master-level qualification through William Blue partner institutions.

The Bachelor of Business (Hospitality Management) is delivered by Torrens University Australia, trading as William Blue at Torrens University Australia CRICOS 03389E.

CRICOS CODE
094179F

What you'll learn:

Course Delivery

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Workload and Assessment

Out of the Classroom and into the Workplace:

Students of the Bachelor of Business (Hospitality Management) will be required to complete 800 hours in approved internship. With the help of the Career Consultants, we partner with industry to provide students practical work while they study. We partner with students to find an organisation in the sector they wish to gain practical experience in. The opportunity to gain professional work experience in the Bachelor Degree and Associate Degree is an invaluable experience for students, giving them important insights.

Typical assessment includes:

Assessments include:
• Practical Demonstration and Observation
• Proposal/Design Rationale
• Process/Research Documentation
• Reflective Journal/Blog
• Report/Essay
• Presentation/Pitch
• Research
• Collaboration
• Individual self-directed major project
• Work integrated learning project work
• Design work for social enterprise

Subject Information

This subject introduces the student to gastronomy and gastronomic heritage, focussing on the role of beverages, the history of meals and their significance to both guests and service providers, the history and importance of restaurants and the development of gastronomic writing. Contemporary regional and indigenous cuisines are explored, including the importance of ethical foods such as organics, the slow food movement, socially responsible food and sustainable or eco gastronomy. This subject focuses strongly on gastronomic tourism, and uses case studies and practical assessments of both Australian and international gastronomic destinations to illustrate the rise, opportunities and challenges and innovations of sustaining such tourism. The impacts of gastronomic tourism, issues relating to regional destination marketing, and the growth of both food and wine tourism are examined through an introduction to wine varieties and their influence on food.

This subject introduces students to the concept of an organisation, and their role within the organisational context. The student will explore the impact of their relationships and emotional intelligence within a business context, as well as developing the skills to foster effective workplace relationships and to learn how to continue to develop and refine these skills in the workplace. Students will gain an understanding of the idea of cultures within organisations, and how their actions interact within these relationships.

This subject explores how a customers’ perceptions – both conscious and subconscious – effect their relationship with a brand’s value proposition. Students will explore how a customer’s interactions with a brand during the customer life cycle will determine levels of customer satisfaction. Students will analyse Customer Journey Mapping techniques, Employees engagement in the customer experience strategy and metrics of satisfaction, loyalty and advocacy.

This subject introduces students to the concepts of business communications and transferable academic skills. This subject presents an analysis of the types of communication processes which occur in the internal and external business environment, including an examination of the theoretical underpinning of communication in businesses. Emphasis is placed on writing skills, reports, and presentations, and using technology to communicate. The course will provide students with research skills (information literacy), critical analysis, writing and language techniques. Transferable skills including time management and teamwork are incorporated in the course. The aim of this subject is to provide knowledge and skills needed for Higher Education, to help students to manage their own success and to assist students in reaching their academic potential.

Students will gain a solid foundation in the marketing discipline introducing relevant and contemporary concepts, theories and models. The unit magnifies the importance of understanding consumer behaviour, segmentation, targeting and positioning, the extended marketing mix and ethics in marketing. Industry relevance provides students with the opportunity of applying key concepts in practical settings. These marketing foundations are expanded on in other subjects available as electives.

This subject encompasses the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to check guests in and out of commercial accommodation establishments. It requires the ability to check daily arrivals, allocate rooms and complete relevant documentation.

SITHACS303 Provide accommodation reception services

This subject covers the information technology needs of hospitality and tourism businesses. The subject will focus on the Internet and information technology as tools that influence hospitality and tourism businesses. Emphasis is placed on providing a thorough understanding of how e-marketing, e-commerce and online information distribution are keys to commercial success. Students will be taught about the opportunities and problems created by the development of e-commerce, e-commerce IT, E-commerce portals and business models and the legal and ethical issues of e-commerce through the context of Yield and Revenue Management. Students will also learn to use various tools which will assist them in predicting customer demand at the micro market level, and the maximization of revenue through pricing optimization. Students will be required to interpret and utilize financial data to make revenue and yield decisions.

Managers in any area of a business need to be equipped to predict, analyse and explain the industry they’re currently immersed in. In this subject, students will learn how to stay up to date with current innovations within the industry as well as explore and predict future trends through analyzing various data sources, spotting trends, prioritizing details and highlighting information most pertinent to business decisions.

This subject covers the analysis of the macro and micro influences on a business’ strategy and operations. Includes the interactions of Australia’s legal frameworks and global economic principles and the influence on modern organisational decision making. Students will learn about legacy and modern management styles and their application in a dynamic business environment.

The subject aims to provide non-accounting students with a broad, business-based introduction to the conceptual foundations of accounting and finance. The use of management accounting information assists in key areas of planning, controlling, reporting, and decision making. It introduces students to basic concepts and functions of the balance sheet, profit and loss statements, cash flow statements, techniques for analysing financial statements investment decisions, full costing and opportunity costing analysis and managing working capital.

This industry placement allows students to challenge, test, and hone the knowledge and skills they have acquired and developed in the classroom and to anticipate future areas of study. Through this experience, students become familiar with the culture of the culinary industry, developing the values, attitudes, and behaviors that will make them successful in the workplace. Each student must complete this 800-hour supervised internship at an approved internship site

By the use of a computer-based simulation, a reflective experiential learning approach is used in this Subject. This subject will draw on industry knowledge and business skills acquired in earlier studies and provide the student with an ability to develop and evaluate both marketing and management strategies and implement operational plans required to effectively manage a serviced-based enterprise.Both service operations management and services marketing principles are applied to strategies developed to manage a limited capacity service enterprise.

The subject introduces students to the discipline of risk management in a hospitality context. Risk management involves the identification, analysis, and monitoring of risks that have the potential to be of importance (for good or ill) to organisations as well as how they respond to them. In this subject students will explore the background to risk management, who the key stakeholders are, the role of risk management in strategic planning and environmental scanning, and how risk management impacts upon both the public and private sectors. It discusses risk management strategies and introduces students to the field of crisis communication management and corporate social responsibility. Current risks are identified and tracked to give students an idea of environmental scanning and risk identification. The subject will also explore Incident and Accident reporting requirements and the financial implications of risk management.

In this subject, students design and plan the implementation of a multi-use development. Students consider all aspects of launching a new enterprise; with the guidance of faculty and industry mentors, they design the space, develop a business plan including budgets, plan menus, etc. Drawing on each other’s areas of expertise in business, culinary, psychology, and hospitality, students learn to work in teams and how to use consultants with specific skill sets. Each student team produces a portfolio for presentation and demonstration to a panel of industry experts for critique and feedback.

This course seeks to build the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to succeed as an entrepreneur. These knowledge and skills are then applied to identify and evaluate innovative high-growth product and service opportunities in the context of a start-up, a corporation, a not-for-profit or a government institution. The course equips students with practical skills, including creativity tools, cash-flow modelling, business model analysis and lean experimentation.

The unit builds upon earlier discussions of corporate social responsibility (CSR), the practice by which organisations acknowledge the impact of their activities in economic, social, and environmental terms. The unit begins with an examination of the theories of CSR and discusses why organisations around the world are increasingly moving to reduce the adverse effects of business operations. It discusses some of the most common practices associated with CSR and examines the link between social responsibility and corporate governance, in the context of corporate sustainability. The unit critically examines the concept of triple bottom line and sustainability reporting before exploring the idea of corporate philanthropy, communicating the organisational CSR message, and how CSR can help develop the organisational brand. The unit makes extensive use of case studies and encourages students to research and assess how organisations conduct themselves as corporate and global citizens.

This subject explores the theoretical and technical skills, principles and concepts of festival and special events. It examines the nature and characteristics of festivals and special events, their positive and negative impacts on the economic, environmental, socio-cultural and political environments and associated implications pertaining to the sustainable planning and management of them in the global and local marketplace.

This subject introduces the student to events at the initial concept phase, working through the design and planning phases of event creation. The subject will expose students to a wide variety of types of events and students will develop a solid understanding of appropriate event themes and design concepts.

The subject will introduce students to the role of event consultants. It was designed to highlight an array of relevant frameworks, models and other analytical tools which are fundamental to the practice of consulting. Central to the role of good consultancy practice is the ability to identify the main issues (root cause) of an event problem; formulate sound and innovative solutions in the form of recommendations to address the problem; and communicate these recommendations in a concise and clear manner to clients. Students will have the opportunity to participate in teams whilst working on practical projects that will resemble a real-life consulting engagement.

This subject provides students with the opportunity to examine strategic management functions and process in the context of events. The unit focuses on the application of the latest thinking on the area of strategic management to the event environment reinforcing a strategic planning and management framework.

This subject requires students investigate how to manage, plan and evaluate the sporting facilities that sports teams and local communities rely on for their recreational and sporting needs. Different types of sports venues, construction and refurbishment, venue design, risk management, technology, and venue management will be discussed in detail.

This subject introduces students to the processes behind the targeting, procuring and managing financial support for events. The subject explores alternative revenue sources available to the event; it extends the student beyond a traditional understanding of sponsorship into thinking of events as assets and saleable commodities.

This subject introduces the student to venue management as an integral part of event management and operations. It acknowledges that each venue is different but that each venue operates within a broad industry model. Students will be exposed to different venue types and sectors and the general management principles; including the asset management, maintenance, repair and purchase processes.

Building upon event concepts and design knowledge, this subject introduces the student to the skills and knowledge of event operation and management and the student will be able to learn how and where to apply the various operations and management tools. The unit further exposes the student to the strategic framework and strategic planning function; contextualised within the event management and operations environment.

This subject introduces the student to events at the initial concept phase, working through the design and planning phases of event creation. The subject will expose students to a wide variety of types of events and students will develop a solid understanding of appropriate event themes and design concepts.

Businesses today are increasingly adopting a project-based approach to undertake and manage a diverse mix of business activities ranging from recruitment and change management to product development and implementation. Project management allows organisations to more effectively manage human and financial resources and to meet specific time constraints. This subject introduces students to the field of project management. It explores the historical development of project management and introduces students to the Project Management Body of Knowledge.

It examines the theoretical underpinnings of project management and looks at such specific elements as the project life cycle, the role of the project manager, the use of project teams, issues affecting project implementation, and planning, scheduling, and costing. It also explores how technology is used to assist in the management of projects and discusses various project management tools.

This unit examines the global event environment and exposes the student to major global event organisations. Students will be introduced to the intersection of government policy and global events, and the key trends emerging in the global event sphere. The aim of the unit is to provide the student with a keen understanding of how the global event industry works, the major institutional and national players in the industry and, in the economic and political context, their impact upon everyday lives.

This unit introduces students to the processes behind the targeting, procuring and managing financial support for events. The unit explores alternative revenue sources available to the event; it extends the student beyond a traditional understanding of sponsorship into thinking of events as assets and saleable commodities.

The unit examines the 7Ps (price, product, place, promotion, people, processes and physical evidence) of the services marketing mix. It places emphasis on relationship management, customer service and customer behaviour, and the link between service quality and customer satisfaction. The unit critically analyses service marketing planning and strategy and provides students with the opportunity to participate in a practical exercise to plan and develop their own service marketing strategy.

This unit explores the sport event in depth. It takes the student through the depth and breadth of the sport event industry and the process of delivering a sport event. Students will examine the importance of the sport event sector to the Australian economy and culture, and explore some of the social and ethical impacts of sport. Students will be introduced to unique aspects of sport events and the specific tools used to deliver and manage them. Students will have the opportunity to become familiar with sport event scheduling and the issues surrounding implementing and managing large scale sporting events.

This unit introduces the student to the event bidding process – the process by which organisations, cities and nations (from small to large) make their offers to host an event. Students will be exposed to the life cycle of a bid; starting with the research process and how to find the right event to bid for, through to identifying (government and corporate) support mechanisms and preparing and presenting the bid documentation. Students will learn the importance of analysing the bid request. They will be introduced to the key elements of the bid/tendering process. The unit aims to provide the student with the wherewithal to find, analyse and produce an event bid.

This unit explores the wedding event in depth. It takes the student through the gamut of the wedding industry and the process of delivering the client’s dream. Students will be exposed to the contemporary and traditional, the conservative and the alternative, the religious and secular in wedding concept and design. Students will have the opportunity to examine contemporary issues in marriage and marriage law.

By the use of a computer-based simulation, a reflective experiential learning approach is used in this subject. This subject will draw on industry knowledge and business skills acquired in earlier studies and provide the student with an ability to develop and evaluate both marketing and management strategies and implement operational plans required to effectively manage a destination. Working in groups, students will gain a real world understanding of the challenges of managing a real-world destination and the impact on local enterprise.

This subject introduces students to the conceptual approaches to the study and management of tourist experiences by combining the perspectives of the tourist consumer with that of experience managers. The subject begins by examining the social construction of the tourist experience, the psychology of the tourist, tourist motivation and the journey from desire to execution and the various influences. It then explores the different interactions of tourists with tourism service providers, hosts and host cultures. In addition it considers how tourist operators manage tourist satisfaction and assesses and evaluates the tourist experience.

This subject examines the role of cross-cultural awareness and communication in the development of international tourism in the context of global destination marketing. The course especially seeks to develop an appreciation in students of different cultures and how cross cultural communication influences and enriches the tourism experience. The course examines international tourism trends from the perspective of the major generating and destination regions. This subject will provide an opportunity for in-depth study of important issues and aspects of tourism planning, management and marketing. The mains issues and aspects encompass destination image, authenticity, commodification, sense of place, and (media) representation.

This subject introduces students to the concept of marketing strategy and its position within business strategy and organisational goals. It covers the principles and techniques of creating, implementing, and evaluating a marketing strategy, including analysis of market opportunities and formulating marketing strategies for a variety of different business environments. This subject culminates with a discussion of useful tools and techniques for developing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a marketing plan.

Wine and Beverage knowledge is paramount in ensuring the customer experience within your restaurant meets customer expectations. Within this subject, students will learn how to enhance the customer experience through effective wine and beverage management. Students will experience a variety of Australian and International Wines, Spirits, and other beverages and be able to discuss the intricacies of food and beverage matching. In addition to learning the history of these wines, spirits and beverages, the subject will be designed in such a way that students will also be accredited the WSET Level 1 Award in Wines

This subject aims to give hotel and tourism professionals a comprehensive understanding of the international cruise ship business by focusing on areas which influence development and where demand is set to increase. Employment, safety at sea, marketing, environmental, social-cultural and economic impacts of cruise ships are examined.
This subject is a residential study tour.

This subject focuses on airline business and marketing strategies. Key airline functional areas such as airline forecasting, pricing, business models and alliances will be included. The interaction between airline operations, business planning, marketing strategies and international aviation will be explored as they relate to airline business and marketing plans.

Tourism is inextricably linked to the concept of ‘destination’ and effective marketing and management of destinations is vital for success in the tourism market. This unit introduces students to the concepts, principles, and processes relating to the creation and development of tourism destinations. It examines the historical, economic, socio-cultural and environmental factors involved in the creation of destinations, the elements that go into the design of destinations, and the concept of the destination as a product. Students will gain an understanding of tourist motivation in relation to destinations and how to market and develop destinations with the customer’s needs in mind. It considers the role of the business plan in destination development and marketing and the broader issue of business management principles in tourism.

This subject introduces the student to the dynamic multi-billion dollar gaming industry. Students will review the history of gaming and also obtain an insight into the social, economic and marketing aspects of the industry. Furthermore, they will be exposed to gaming in an international context including resorts and cruise ships. It will also provide a review of popular casino games and investigate regulations in various jurisdictions as well as current trends nationally and internationally.

This subject provides an overview of the characteristics of resorts and spas and the management requirements, including the application of financial and marketing strategies. Students will explore the role of consumer demand on shaping the resort and spa experience and investigate the health and wellness industry in this context. This unit will take an international focus, and through case studies, the nature of the resort and spa product will be analysed in terms of its geographical location and what unique experiences it can offer the guest.

This unit provides students with theoretical knowledge and practical application of the brand building process and the role of the marketing mix within it. It begins with the strategic importance of brand management and presents a consumer-focused model of brand equity. It explores the contribution of advertising to strategies for building and sustaining strong brands over time.

This unit introduces students to the ways in which the internet and new interactive technologies can be used and combined with traditional marketing strategies and practises. It focuses on new business models that add customer value, build customer relationships and increase company profitability. The unit examines topics such as e-marketing strategy, the e-marketing plan, global markets, consumer behaviour, the e-marketing mix, customer relationship management and the ethical and legal issues involved in e-marketing.

This unit introduces students to the concept of marketing strategy and its position within business strategy and organisational goals. It covers the principles and techniques of creating, implementing, and evaluating a marketing strategy, including analysis of market opportunities and formulating marketing strategies for a variety of different business environments. This unit culminates with a discussion of useful tools and techniques for developing, implementing, monitoring, and evaluating a marketing plan.

This unit builds the students design and development portfolio and further steeps them in the event concept, theme, design and development process. Students will be exposed to advanced design and staging concepts and the contemporary tools used to facilitate the event design process. Students will have the opportunity to examine and analyse the usage and application of various specialist event design areas.

This subject focuses on food and beverage management within the hospitality industry. It emphasizes management techniques concerned with controlling all facets of an operation, from managing labour costs, purchasing, the planning of a menu and the delivery of quality food and beverage experiences. Quality and control investigates the relationship between providing quality menu items and products and the operation of the control system, at key production phases. In addition students will explore emerging trends and consider future developments in the food and beverage industry.

The Rooms Division of a hotel/resort enterprise generates the most revenue, and their staff and management have the most interaction with the guests. Therefore the management of the Rooms Division is crucial to the overall profitability and level of guest service that a hotel/resort provides. This subject involves an in-depth analysis of the major components (front office, guest services, housekeeping, reservations, engineering/maintenance and security) of the rooms division within a hotel. The interaction with this division and the other areas of the hotel are explored in relationship to customer service.